My name is Philipp C. Heckel and I write about nerdy things.

Posts Tagged / Go


  • Dec 17 / 2020
  • 0
Code Snippets, Programming

Snippet 0x0F: Recursive search/replace tool “re”

Two and a half years ago, I wrote my first Go program. I wanted to learn another language, and Go looked like a ton of fun: straight forward, easy to learn, and a static binary with no runtime shenanigans. I picked a project and I started hacking. Looking back, the code I wrote is a little cringy, but not terrible. I’d surely do things differently these days, now that I have more Go experience. But we all start somewhere.

However, the tool that I wrote, a recursive search/replace tool which I intelligently dubbed re, is actually incredibly useful: to my own surprise, I use it every day. I haven’t made a single modification to it in all that time (until today for this post). And since I’m in the sharing mood today, I thought I’d share it with the millions of people (cough) that come here every day. Ha!

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  • Dec 13 / 2020
  • 0
Scripting, Security

Go: Calculating public key hashes for public key pinning in curl

Something occurred to me the other day. This is my blog, and that means I can write about whatever I want. Now you may think that’s totally obvious, but it’s not. For the longest time I wouldn’t blog about anything that I didn’t deem blog-worthy. Small things, like “this is a cool function I found” or “I learned this thing today”, were not blog-worthy in my mind for some reason.

Well today I am changing that. I like writing, but not necessarily so much that I always want to write a super long post. Sometimes, things should be short. Like this one.

So in this super short post I’m gonna show you a cool thing I figured out: How to calculate the the value that curls --pinnedpubkey option needs in Go.

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  • Jul 22 / 2019
  • 0
Programming

Deduplicating NTFS file systems (fsdup)

At Datto, we store hundreds of thousands of block-level backups for our customers. Since our customer base is mostly Windows focused, most of these backups are copies of NTFS file systems. As of today, we’re not performing any data deduplication on these backups, which is pretty crazy considering that how well you’d think a Windows OS will probably dedup.

So I started on a journey to attempt to dedup NTFS. This blog post briefly describes my journey and thoughts, but also introduces a tool called fsdup I developed as part of a 3 week proof-of-concept. Please note that while the tool works, it’s highly experimental and should not be used in production!

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